Keep Cancer at Bay by Starting 2016 with Life-Saving Screening

 

 

At what age is it best to do the right thing and get tested and what are the specifics?

Age 20-29

At this age, a cancer-related check-up should be part of your periodic health exams and might include exams for cancers of the thyroid, mouth, skin, lymph nodes, testicles, and ovaries. A check-up should also include discussion of tobacco use, sun exposure, diet and nutrition, physical activity, disease risk factors, sexual practices, and whether you’re exposed to any dangerous substances at work or at home.

MEN

Colon Cancer Testing

Find out if you are at higher than average risk of colon cancer because of family history, genetic disorders or other factors. If not, then testing is not needed at this time. If you are at increased risk talk to us about when you need to start testing and what tests are right for you.

WOMEN

Breast Cancer Testing

Report any changes in the way your breasts feel and come in and see us right away.
Find out if you are at higher than average risk for breast cancer. If not, then testing is not needed at this time. If you are, come see us about when you need to start getting mammograms or other tests.

Cervical Cancer Testing

Starting at age 21 and through age 29 all women should have a Pap test done every two years. HPV tests should not be done unless a Pap test is abnormal. Follow testing recommendations even if you’ve been vaccinated against HPV.

Colon Cancer Testing

Find out if you are at higher than average risk for colon cancer because of family history, genetic disorders or other factors. If not, then testing is not needed at this time. If you are at increased risk ask us about when you need to start testing and what tests are right for you.

Age 30-39

MEN

Colon Cancer Testing

Find out if you are at higher than average risk for colon cancer because of family history, genetic disorders, or other factors. If not, then testing is not needed at this time. If you are at increased risk ask us about when you need to start testing and what tests are right for you.

WOMEN

Breast Cancer Testing
Report to us changes in the way your breasts look or feel. Find out if you are at higher than average risk for breast cancer. If not, then testing is not needed at this time. If you are, ask us about when you need to start getting mammograms or other tests.

Cervical Cancer Testing
Starting at age 30, women at average risk should get a Pap test screening every two years and HPV test every five years (the preferred approach) or they can continue to get only a Pap test every two years.
Follow testing recommendations even if you’ve been vaccinated against HPV.
No testing is needed after a hysterectomy that removed the uterus and cervix if it was done for reasons not related to cervical cancer.

Colon Cancer Testing
Find out if you are at higher than average risk for colon cancer because of family history, genetic disorders, or other factors. If not, then testing is not needed at this time. If you are at increased risk, ask us about when you need to start testing and what tests are right for you.

Age 40-49

MEN

Colon Cancer Testing
Find out if you are at higher than average risk for colon cancer because of family history, genetic disorders, or other factors. If not, then testing is not needed at this time. If you are at increased risk, ask us about when you need to start testing and what tests are right for you.

Prostate Cancer Testing
Men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer should talk with a doctor about the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits of testing starting at age 45 so they can decide if they want to be tested. This includes African-American men and men with close family members (father, brother, son) who had prostate cancer before age 65.
Men with more than one close relative who had prostate cancer before age 65 are at even higher risk and should talk with a doctor about testing starting at age 40.

WOMEN

Breast Cancer Testing
Report to us any changes in the way your breasts look or feel right away. Women ages 40 to 44 should have the choice to start annual breast cancer screening with mammograms if they wish to do so. The pros and cons of screening should be considered when making this decision. Starting at age 45, women should get mammograms every year.

Cervical Cancer Testing
Get a Pap test every two years and a HPV test done every five years (preferred approach) or get just a Pap test every two years. Follow testing recommendations even if you’ve been vaccinated against HPV. No testing is needed after a hysterectomy that removed the uterus and cervix if it was done for reasons not related to cervical cancer.

Colon Cancer Testing
Find out if you are at higher than average risk for colon cancer because of family history, genetic disorders, or other factors. If not, then testing is not needed at this time. If you are at increased risk, ask us about when you need to start testing and what tests are right for you.

Age 50-64

MEN

Colon Cancer Testing
All men at average risk should start testing at age 50. There are several testing options. Talk with us about which tests are best for you and how often testing should be done.

Prostate Cancer Testing
Starting at age 50, all men at average risk should talk with us about the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits of testing so they can decide if they want to be tested.

Lung Cancer Testing
If you are age 55 or older, talk to us about your smoking history and whether you should get yearly low-dose CT scans to screen for early lung cancer.
WOMEN

Breast Cancer Testing
Report any changes to us in the way your breasts look or feel right away. Women ages 50 to 54 should get mammograms every year. Be sure you understand the pros and cons of breast cancer screening.

Cervical Cancer Testing
Get a Pap test every two years and HPV test every five years (preferred approach) or Pap test alone every two years. Follow testing recommendations even if you have been vaccinated against HPV.

Colon Cancer Testing
All women at average risk should start testing at age 50. There are several testing options. Ask us about which tests are best for you and how often testing should be done.

Lung Cancer Testing
If you are age 55 or older, talk to us about your smoking history and whether you should get yearly low-dose CT scans to screen for early lung cancer

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