March 9th World Kidney Day Theme: Kidney Disease & Obesity

According to the latest WHO data kidney disease deaths in Indonesia reached 41,042 at the same time evidence shows that obesity, which was previously a problem among high-income groups in the country, has spread across all income groups. Is there a relation?

According to World Kidney Day website, obesity is a potent risk factor for the development of kidney disease increasing the risk of developing Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), like diabetes and hypertension. Obesity has a direct impact on the development of CKD and end stage renal disease (ESRD): in individuals affected by obesity, the kidneys have to work harder, filtering more blood than normal (hyper filtration) to meet the metabolic demands of the increased body weight. The increase in function can damage the kidney and raise the risk of developing CKD in the long-term.

And here’s the good news: obesity, as well as CKD, is largely preventable and awareness of the risks of obesity and a healthy lifestyle, including proper nutrition and exercise, will dramatically help in preventing obesity and kidney disease.

This year World Kidney Day promotes education about the harmful consequences of obesity and its association with kidney disease, advocating healthy lifestyle and health policy measures that make preventive behaviors an affordable option.

In this context, Dr. Csaba Kovesdy, Dr. Susan Furth and Dr. Carmine Zoccali have written the editorial “Obesity and kidney disease: hidden consequences of the epidemic.” This paper provides an excellent summary and rationale for WKD 2017, whose focus is on the relationship between obesity and kidney disease.

Obesity is a growing worldwide epidemic and one of the strongest risk factors for new-onset chronic kidney disease, nephrolithiasis and kidney cancer. This year the World Kidney Day promotes education on the harmful consequences of obesity and its association with kidney disease, advocating healthy lifestyle and health policy measures that make preventive behaviors an affordable option.

The relation between Kidney Disease and Obesity
Kidney disease is more likely to develop in obese people including in those with diabetes and hypertension. By 2025, obesity will affect 18% of men and over 21% of women worldwide, and that severe obesity will affect 6% of all men and 9% of all women around the world. In some nations, obesity is already present in more than one-third of the adult population and contributes significantly to overall poor health and high annual medical costs.

In the general population, obesity increases the risk of death and contributes to many other diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, obstructive sleep apnea, fatty liver, gall bladder disease, osteoarthritis, various cancers, mental disorders, and poor quality of life.

A growing body of evidence indicates that obesity is also a potent risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). People who are overweight or obese have 2 to 7 more chances of developing ESRD compared to those of normal weight.

Obesity may lead to CKD both indirectly by increasing type 2 diabetes, hypertension and heart disease, and also by causing direct kidney damage by increasing the workload of the kidneys and other mechanisms.

Health-e reporting with sources: worldkidneyday.org; Asia Pathways; World Life Expectancy

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The first hospital in Indonesia with accreditation from Australian Council on Healthcare Standard International  (ACHSI)

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